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5 Bad Parenting Tips For Good Kids

By on April 25, 2014
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See why eating candy regularly is good for kids. Seriously!

5. ARGUING WITH YOUR KIDS
Every parent winds up saying, “Because I said so!” at some point. What’s the alternative? Sit there and debate with your 11-year-old on the merits of a new toy truck or a face tattoo? No, in these situations it’s best to quickly put your foot down and make it clear who’s the boss. Or is it?

SURPRISING BENEFIT:

Actually, science says that those fights provide excellent opportunities for your children to practice their reasoning, discussion and negotiation skills. So as long as they are using rational arguments and calmly explaining their point of view to you, don’t immediately go all alpha dog and end the conversation. According to research, your willingness to have a discussion might actually save your younglings from a life of alcohol and drugs down the line.

4. REGULARLY GIVING KIDS CANDY
Everyone knows how damaging refined sugar is to kids. Not only is it addictive, but it also rots your teeth and is the leading cause of the childhood obesity epidemic.

SURPRISING BENEFIT:

Let’s be very clear about this: We’re not merely saying that candy won’t kill your kid, but rather that children who regularly eat sweets can end up way healthier than those who don’t.
What the research actually showed was that moderate amounts of sugar eaten frequently over a long period can have very positive effects on a young body. None of that will mean squat, however, if you don’t put your kid on a balanced diet or make him kick a ball from time to time.

3. LETTING THEM PLAY IN THE DIRT
When you were a kid, did you ever get yelled at because you didn’t get dirty enough? Hell, no. It was all “Get out of the mud, you’re going to ruin your new shoes!” and “Don’t eat that worm, it lives in poop!”

SURPRISING BENEFIT:

Playing in the dirt can make your kids smarter, stave off depression and save them from future diseases. Dirt exposes kids to the good guys of the bacteria world and preps their immune systems to handle bigger challenges down the line. The more pathogens a baby has to fight off before the age of 2, the less chance that baby has of developing health problems like asthma or heart disease or OCD.

2. ALLOWING RISKY PLAY
“Get down from there!” is the sound grown-ups make when you get up on the roof with the intention of seeing if you can skateboard right off into the pool. Researchers refer to “risky play” as any form of playing with a risk of physical injury, usually performed outdoors without adult supervision, like tree climbing, bike riding, rollerskating, and wrestling.

SURPRISING BENEFIT:

Injuries sustained by kids from falls and tumbles almost never result in any permanent damage, with death occurring basically never. Bruises and fractures are common, but they are a small price to pay considering the end result: protecting children from crippling phobias in their adult lives. Children who are exposed to stimuli like heights or high speeds at an early age are less likely to fear them as they grow up … especially if they get injured in the process.

1. FORCING ALL THOSE EXTRACURRICULARS
There’s actually a term for this kind of oppressive parenting: “concerted cultivation.” As a response to this obviously wrong parenting trend, “free-range parenting” has lately started to become more and more popular.

SURPRISING BENEFIT:

Among kids between the ages of 9 and 12 from 43 families, those who had participated in roughly two hours a day of organized activities were more active and socially mature, and had more self-esteem, than the kids left alone to explore the world on their own. Taking an active part in your children’s play time doesn’t necessarily mean hovering over them constantly, the key lies in moderation.

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